Archive for October, 2012

Fabian Rohner, PhD

Fabian Rohner is an international nutrition and public health specialist, focusing on the design and management of impact evaluations and M&E plans for large-scale food fortification and infant and young child nutrition projects. Fabian has conducted clinical trials related to the prevention and treatment of malaria, helminths and micronutrient malnutrition, and maternal and child health. Fabian has conducted multiple national micronutrient surveys, and is an expert in iron and iodine deficiencies. He served on the iodine expert panel of the NIH-led BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) initiative, and is a member of the BRINDA (Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia) project and serves on the technical advisory panel for the Power of Nutrition. He has worked on projects in Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mali, Morocco, Niger, the Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. He is currently based in Hanoi, Vietnam.

James P Wirth, PhD

James is an international nutrition specialist, focusing on the design and implementation of national public health and nutrition surveys, research on the determinants of stunting and anemia, and monitoring and evaluation reporting systems. James has conducted case control studies related examining the association between inflammation and enteropathy on child growth, and has conducted multiple national micronutrient and nutrition surveys. James is a member of steering committee of the BRINDA (Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia) project, and has managed qualitative program evaluations related to food fortification and humanitarian response. He has worked in Angola, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Gambia, India, Jordan, Kenya, Mozambique, Oman, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, and Zambia. James is currently based in Geneva, Switzerland.

Bradley Woodruff, MD MPH

Bradley Woodruff is a physician and epidemiologist. He worked at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for 20 years from 1987 to 2007. During his CDC career, he assisted UN agencies and non-governmental organizations by providing nutrition and health assistance to persons affected by humanitarian emergencies, and supervised a team of CDC epidemiologists and nutritionists who carried out national nutrition surveys. As a consultant, Dr. Woodruff supported national surveys in Bangladesh, Georgia, Mongolia, the Philippines, and the United Arab Emirates, and researched the association of household food security and child malnutrition in Uganda, and the effectiveness of supplemental feeding in Ethiopia and home fortification in China. He currently serves as a Senior Epidemiology and Public Health consultant to GroundWork, and has provided survey design and data analysis support to nutrition surveys in Azerbaijan, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, India, Sierra Leone, and Zambia. He also led a quantitative analysis project investigating the determinants of stunting reduction in Ethiopia. He is currently based in Victoria, Canada.

Vitamin D status and determinants of deficiency among non-pregnant Jordanian women of reproductive age.

NICHOLS EK, KHATIB IM, ABURTO NJ, SULLIVAN KM, SCANLON KS, WIRTH JP, SERDULA MK.

June 2012, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

While sunlight is an important vitamin D source, previous investigations among women whose culture encourages skin covering have been small, not nationally representative, or both. We investigated serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D(3)) status and factors associated with deficiency in a nationally representative survey of 2013 Jordanian women of reproductive age in Spring 2010. We measured 25(OH)D(3) concentrations by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and calculated prevalence ratios for deficiency associated with skin covering and other factors. Results showed 60.3% (95% CI: 57.1-63.4%) deficiency (12 ng/ml) and 95.7% (95% CI: 94.4-96.8%) insufficiency (20 ng/ml) among women. Prevalence of deficiency was 1.60 times higher for women who covered with a scarf/hijab (95% CI: 1.06-2.40, P = 0.024) and 1.87 times higher for women who wore full cover, or a niqab (95% CI: 1.20-2.93, P = 0.006), compared with the women who did not wear a scarf/hijab or niqab.

Azerbaijan National Micronutrient Survey

Project Completed

 
GroundWork is providing technical support to UNICEF and national stakeholders to plan and implement a national micronutrient survey in Azerbaijan. GroundWork’s support includes the development of a scientific survey protocol, training of survey field staff, supervision of data collection, analysis of data and drafting of the survey report.

Mozambique Micronutrient Survey

Project Completed

 
GroundWork is currently providing technical assistance and oversight of the biomarker component of the 2012-2013 Micronutrient Survey in Mozambique. This support includes the co-development of the scientific survey protocol, the training of survey field staff, and supervision of data collection. GroundWork will also support the analysis of the survey results and drafting of the report. This survey will serve as the baseline to Mozambique’s national food fortification program.

Kenya National Micronutrient Survey

Project Completed

 
GroundWork is currently providing technical assistance to the stakeholders of the Kenya National Micronutrient Survey. This assistance includes coordinating the shipment and analysis of biological samples, the analysis of the survey results, and the drafting of the survey report.

Comparison of a possession score and a poverty index in predicting anaemia and undernutrition in pre-school children and women of reproductive age in rural and urban Côte d’Ivoire.

ROHNER F, TSCHANNEN AB, NORTHROP-CLEWES C, KOUASSI-GOHOU V, BOSSO PE, MASCIE-TAYLOR CGN.

June 2012, Public Health Nutrition

This article determines whether a possession score or a poverty index best predicts undernutrition and anaemia in women of reproductive age (15-49 years; WRA) and children aged 6-59 months living in Côte d’Ivoire. These socio-economic measures were compared for their ability to predict anaemia and malnutrition in women and children. Using data from a nationally representative survey conducted in Côte d’Ivoire in 2007, the poverty index showed a stronger relationship with nutritional status than the possession score; mean Hb difference between the poorest and wealthiest quintiles in children and WRA was 8·2 g/l and 6·5 g/l, respectively (13·9 % and 19·8 % difference in anaemia, respectively; P < 0·001), and Z-scores and BMI were significantly better in the wealthiest quintile (P < 0·001).

Mapping malaria risk among children in Cote d’Ivoire using Bayesian geo-statistical models.

RASO G, SCHUR N, UTZINGER J, KOUDOU BG, TCHICAYA ES, ROHNER F, N’GORAN EK, SILUÉ KD, MATTHYS B, ASSI S, TANNER M, VOUNATSOU P.

May 2012, Malaria Journal

Using different data sources, a systematic review was carried out to compile and georeference survey data on Plasmodium spp. infection prevalence in Cote d’Ivoire, focusing on children aged 16 years. The period from 1988 to 2007 was covered. A suite of Bayesian geo-statistical logistic regression models was fitted to analyse malaria risk. High-risk areas were mainly found in the north-central and western area, while relatively low-risk areas were located in the north at the country border, in the northeast, in the south-east around Abidjan, and in the central-west between two high prevalence areas. The malaria risk map at high spatial resolution gives an important overview of the geographical distribution of the disease in Cote d’Ivoire. It is a useful tool for the national malaria control programme and can be utilized for spatial targeting of control interventions and rational resource allocation.

Micronutrient Deficits Are Still Public Health Issues among Women and Young Children in Vietnam

LAILLOU A, VAN PHAM T, TRAN NT, THI LE H, WIERINGA F, ROHNER F, FORTIN S, BACH LE M, THANH TRAN D, MOENCH-PFANNER R, BERGER J.

April 2012, PLoS ONE

As no national data existed on the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies, a survey was conducted in 2010 to assess the micronutrient status of randomly selected women of reproductive age (n=1526) and children aged 6–75 months (n=586). In women, according to international thresholds, prevalence of zinc deficiency (ZnD, 67.2±2.6%) and vitamin B12 deficiency (11.7±1.7%) represented public health problems, whereas prevalence of anemia (11.6±1.0%) and iron deficiency (ID, 13.7±1.1%) were considered low, and folate (3%) and vitamin A (VAD, 2%) deficiencies were considered negligible. However, many women had marginal folate (25.1%) and vitamin A status (13.6%). Moreover, overweight (BMI≥23 kg/m2 for Asian population) or underweight occurred in 20% of women respectively highlighting the double burden of malnutrition. In children, a similar pattern was observed for ZnD (51.9±3.5%), anemia (9.1±1.4%) and ID (12.9±1.5%) whereas prevalence of marginal vitamin A status was also high (47.3±2.2%). There was a significant effect of age on anemia and ID prevalence, with the youngest age group (6–17 mo) having the highest risk for anemia, ID, ZnD and marginal vitamin A status as compared to other groups. Though the prevalence of anemia and ID in Vietnam has been markedly reduced over the last decade, a large part of the population is still at risk for other deficiencies such as zinc, vitamin A, folate and vitamin B12 especially the youngest children aged 6–17 mo.

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